Writing for Work: on Passwords and Better Practices

Broken glass pieces sticking out of the stop of a stucco wallI wrote for work! I love writing for work. This time, I got to write the first entry in our security series and talk about sufficiently complex passwords, how to store them, and how to manage them across time and breaches. (Bonus: my predilection for taking travel pictures of forbidding fences and danger signs wound up being really helpful in our quest to avoid trite security-themed clip art.)

This was an exciting one to write. We’re not a security company (in fact, we are infrastructuralists, in case you had not heard), but good, solid practices, including security in all its forms, do touch our work pretty often. (See: the conversations I have with people who work with my client periodically about how we cannot use AMIs made by outsiders, we cannot use Docker containers not created internally, and we need a really-no-seriously good reason to peer our VPC to theirs.)

However, like lots of people in tech or even tech adjacent, the people we love who¬†aren’t in tech and aren’t so steeped in this stuff ask us for guidance in how to be safer online from a technological standpoint. My password post (tl;dr: get a password manager, change all those reused passwords, repent and sin no more) is the first; we’ll also be covering how vital software updates are, how treacherous email can be, and why ad blockers are good for more than just telling popups to stfu. We’re writing this series to have a good, reliable resource for us and for others called to do Loved One Tech Support so that even those not glued to their laptop for the duration of their professional lives can adopt good practices and not be totally hosed the next time some major company’s store of usernames and passwords gets breached.