Yum and ldapsearch: a Lesson for 28 April

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The question of how to install things still trips me up sometimes. There are a bunch of possible ways it could be done in any given situation, and fairly often, the preferred method isn’t detailed overly meticulously in the README or other docs. Sometimes you have to clone repos and run a certain command in that directory; sometimes it means adding something to /usr/bin and opening a new terminal window; sometimes you summon a UI with a texty terminal command, which feels oddly like sorcery to me.

It’s a good deal easier now, but when I was just starting it could be a real trial. I spent a lot of an afternoon at Hackbright struggling with Postgres because I did a brew install instead of Postgres.app, which… did not get me what I needed and introduced a host of other problems. (It did get me a really interesting philosophical kind of conversation about the pros and cons of installing things from too high a level, courtesy of a teacher who became my friend – who still semifondly recalls that time she had to unpick what fuckery I’d wrought in such good faith.)

Today, trying to figure out how to get the command ldapsearcavailable to me, I learned one thing and was reminded of another.

  1. I learned yum whatprovides */$WhatYouSeek. (Thanks, Server Fault.) In my case, ldapsearch was one of several commands inside a differently named package: openldap. Oho. (It’s actually in a couple different families of packages, but I do not need to get Perl up in my business today.)
  2. I was reminded that – less commonly for the kind of work that I do – sometimes the needed command is not the name of the package. Some packages aren’t all about one command doing one thing well, despite the best urgings of the Unix philosophy. So – ldapsearch is snuggled into openldap. Got it.

Now you’ve got it too.

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